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TRADITIONAL UX ENGAEMENTS

Historically, companies have completed UX research in one of two ways: they hired an external UX resource, often a partner agency, to serve as the UX “department”.  The agency would be responsible for completing all UX related work. Alternatively, companies kept a fresh rolodex of external UX resources, often organized by strengths or specialties, to be hired when project work was in demand; in this scenario, the agency would work on a project by project basis.

Determining which way to include UX testing in their product development lifecycle or service design tends to be directly related to the skills and availability of internal UX professionals.  Scarcity in these resources leads to an evaluation of deadlines, cost, and the internal perspective of overall need for the project.

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Strengths and Weaknesses of a True Intent Study

Do you really know your users? Usability testing is great way to figure out how someone would interact with your app or site, but the results are only valid if the people you bring are representative of your real users. The True Intent methodology is one of, if not the best UX approaches for learning who your users are, what they intend to do on your site, and how successful they are in doing that. Let’s explore exactly what is this particular methodology, and focus on the strengths and weaknesses of a true intent study.

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Top 10 KLI Blogs of 2016

December, 23 2016 |

 

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Creating a Successful User Experience for Your Mobile Offering

December, 20 2016 | Mobile, UX

By combining years of knowledge gained by optimizing the mobile solutions of leading companies across all industry segments, the researchers on our team have compiled a short checklist that will help you design a mobile user research study. Elements from each phase of the project are included.

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5 Commonly Used Metrics in User Research

November, 10 2016 | Usability Testing, Strategy, UX, Tips & Tricks

The only way to assess whether a product enables users to achieve their intended goals is by measurement. Metrics are standardized methods of measuring aspects of user experience to establish benchmarks, and evaluate design interactions over time. Here are 5 commonly used metrics in user research explained:

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Card Sort for Information Architecture Redesign

 Do you think or know that navigating your website is less than ideal for your site visitors? If so, your Information Architecture (IA) may require a revamp. One of the most widely used research methods to uncover the answer is card sorting.

What is a card sort?

Card sorting is a popular technique (generative method) that can help you gain insights into how your users/site visitors think about the organization of your online content; it helps you understand their mental model. This research method can be conducted in-person (offline) or using an online tool. My colleague, Andrew Schall, our Director of User Research, wrote an article on the pros/cons of these two different data collection methods and when to use them.

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5 Steps to Recruit & Onboard Participants for Remote Usability Studies

For many usability studies, recruitment can be a major challenge. It involves a series of activities, including identifying eligible participants, explaining the study, obtaining consent, and retaining the participants until the study is complete. There can also be additional challenges when a study is being conducted remotely.

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Methods for Running a Successful Diary Study

October, 19 2016 | Usability Testing, UX, Diary Study

Diary studies are a proven method for capturing the habits of your users over a longer period of time compared to in-lab studies.  A diary study is a form of qualitative research that allows participants to self-report their activities, feelings, and thoughts over a period of time.   Diary studies have a data collection period as short as 2-3 days to 30 days; there are outliers of course (such as studying the usage of medical products over time).   In the past few years, we’ve seen an uptick in diary studies being used to help understand the end-to-end customer journey (from awareness to advocacy). 

New tools are available that make it easy for participants to record their daily lives and for you as a researcher to monitor and analyze their entries. While diary studies are relatively straightforward to implement, there are important steps that should be taken to ensure that you are getting the most insightful entries from your participants. Here are methods for running a successful diary study.

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3 Tips to Get Leadership to Value UX Using Business Outcomes

A few years ago, we were working with a Fortune 500 company who staffed a few designers who thought they were Apple designers (they weren’t). The lead designer of the team designed a UI that had serious usability issues when we tested it.  Unfortunately, we’ve recognized that some UX designers resist learning from even the most constructive criticism bolstered by actual user research. We were not surprised when the first release of their mobile app received a 2 star rating.

As you might imagine, it truly was an uphill battle to move this client from level 0 on the KLI UX Maturity model (see below) where UX is unimportant to to level 4 where UX is fully integrated, but that was our goal.

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Unmoderated Online vs. Moderated Onsite Studies

 

When you have a hammer, everything looks like a nail. But is that hammer the right tool for the job?

Several third-party remote usability testing suites specialize in hosting unmoderated studies, and all promise powerful insights delivered at a low-cost. The companies can quickly recruit users, then run them through usability scenarios, establish benchmarks, conduct large-scale user research and more. But just because you have such a tool at your disposal, does that mean it’s the right tool for your project? When would you want to opt for an unmoderated online test instead of moderated sessions?


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