Four Key UX Best Practices for Chatbots

May, 16 2017 | Usability Testing, Chatbots

What are chatbots?

Chatbots are AI-controlled assistants that work through conversation in a typical chat flow that users have become accustomed to. Some work through existing chat applications like Facebook Messenger, while others are standalone apps for your mobile device. Chatbots work in a conversational manner, but often include programmed response suggestions for the user to remove the possibility of misinterpreting information. I dove headfirst into some of the current chatbot apps and tested out some of their features to find examples of good user experience principles and came up with these four key UX best practices for utilizing Chatbots.

[Read More]

When Should You Use Clickable Prototypes?

Maybe your client needs to sell a proof of concept to their executive team or they are not sure if they have the correct amount of steps in the application they are wireframing.  An easy and viable UX solution for these kinds of problems is Clickable Prototypes.

[Read More]

Amazon Echo and the Key Lime Miami Office

May, 05 2017 | Usability Testing

A couple of weeks ago, we welcomed a new member into our Miami office here at KLI, LLC. Her name is Alexa and she is an Amazon Echo. Alexa arrived at us in her neat, Amazon prime box and we were all dying to get her up and talking.

In the box came, Alexa and her cord. That was it. Once Alexa was unboxed, all we had to do was plug her in, download the mobile Alexa app to one of our smartphones and she instantly began talking. What could be a more user-friendly start-up?

[Read More]

Our Researchers Can Join Your Team

TRADITIONAL UX ENGAGEMENTS

Historically, companies have completed UX research in one of two ways: they hired an external UX resource, often a partner agency, to serve as the UX “department”.  The agency would then be responsible for completing all the UX related work. Alternatively, companies kept a fresh Rolodex of external UX resources, often organized by strengths or specialties, to be hired when project work was in demand; in this scenario, the agency would work on a project by project basis.

[Read More]

Strengths and Weaknesses of a True Intent Study

Do you really know your users? Usability testing is great way to figure out how someone would interact with your app or site, but the results are only valid if the people you bring are representative of your real users. The True Intent methodology is one of, if not the best UX approaches for learning who your users are, what they intend to do on your site, and how successful they are in doing that. Let’s explore exactly what is this particular methodology, and focus on the strengths and weaknesses of a true intent study.

[Read More]

5 Commonly Used Metrics in User Research

November, 10 2016 | Usability Testing, Strategy, UX, Tips & Tricks

The only way to assess whether a product enables users to achieve their intended goals is by measurement. Metrics are standardized methods of measuring aspects of user experience to establish benchmarks, and evaluate design interactions over time. Here are 5 commonly used metrics in user research explained:

[Read More]

Card Sort for Information Architecture Redesign

 Do you think or know that navigating your website is less than ideal for your site visitors? If so, your Information Architecture (IA) may require a revamp. One of the most widely used research methods to uncover the answer is card sorting.

What is a Card Sort?

Card sorting is a popular technique (generative method) that can help you gain insights into how your users/site visitors think about the organization of your online content; it helps you understand their mental model. This research method can be conducted in-person (offline) or using an online tool. My colleague, Andrew Schall, our Director of User Research, wrote an article on the pros/cons of these two different data collection methods and when to use them.

[Read More]

5 Steps to Recruit & Onboard Participants for Remote Usability Studies

For many usability studies, recruitment can be a major challenge. It involves a series of activities, including identifying eligible participants, explaining the study, obtaining consent, and retaining the participants until the study is complete. There can also be additional challenges when a study is being conducted remotely.

[Read More]

Methods for Running a Successful Diary Study

October, 19 2016 | Usability Testing, UX, Diary Study

Diary studies are a proven method for capturing the habits of your users over a longer period of time compared to in-lab studies.  A diary study is a form of qualitative research that allows participants to self-report their activities, feelings, and thoughts over a period of time.   Diary studies have a data collection period as short as 2-3 days to 30 days; there are outliers of course (such as studying the usage of medical products over time).   In the past few years, we’ve seen an uptick in diary studies being used to help understand the end-to-end customer journey (from awareness to advocacy). 

New tools are available that make it easy for participants to record their daily lives and for you as a researcher to monitor and analyze their entries. While diary studies are relatively straightforward to implement, there are important steps that should be taken to ensure that you are getting the most insightful entries from your participants. Here are methods for running a successful diary study.

[Read More]

Unmoderated Online vs. Moderated Onsite Studies

 When you have a hammer, everything looks like a nail. But is that hammer the right tool for the job?

Several third-party remote usability testing suites specialize in hosting unmoderated studies, and all promise powerful insights delivered at a low-cost. The companies can quickly recruit users, then run them through usability scenarios, establish benchmarks, conduct large-scale user research and more. But just because you have such a tool at your disposal, does that mean it’s the right tool for your project? When would you want to opt for an unmoderated online test instead of moderated sessions?

[Read More]
New Call-to-action

Subscribe to our newsletter.

Search by Topic